Sample articles Archive

  • Nick Thorne takes a look at the family of the well-loved and talented entertainer Victoria Wood Recently we sadly lost Victoria Wood OBE CBE, the much-loved English comedian, actress, singer and songwriter, screen-writer and director. She was noted for her skills in observing culture, and in satirising social classes. Many people will know she was from Lancashire –but what more is known about her family story and can her determination be seen to have been inherited? Victoria was the daughter of Stanley Wood and Helen Wood (née Mape). She was the youngest sibling in a family that included a […] 0

    A comedy heroine descended from a WW1 hero

    Nick Thorne takes a look at the family of the well-loved and talented entertainer Victoria Wood Recently we sadly lost Victoria Wood OBE CBE, the much-loved English comedian, actress, singer and songwriter, screen-writer and director. She was noted for her skills in observing culture, and in satirising social classes. Many people will know she was from Lancashire –but what more is known about her family story and can her determination be seen to have been inherited? Victoria was the daughter of Stanley Wood and Helen Wood (née Mape). She was the youngest sibling in a family that included a […]

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  • Jill Morris finds an online treasure trove of royal records For anyone lucky enough to have found an ancestor with royal connections, or simply those with an interest in the history of the English and British monarchy, the digitised books available in the Peerage, Gentry and Royalty section of The Genealogist’s website (www.thegenealogist.co.uk) will prove a very useful tool in furthering enquiries. The dates covered range from 43AD–1937 – that’s almost 2000 years of royal history and genealogical information. As well copious records of various royals and their families and peers, records of Royalist fighters during the English Civil […] 0

    Blue sap in the family tree?

    Jill Morris finds an online treasure trove of royal records For anyone lucky enough to have found an ancestor with royal connections, or simply those with an interest in the history of the English and British monarchy, the digitised books available in the Peerage, Gentry and Royalty section of The Genealogist’s website (www.thegenealogist.co.uk) will prove a very useful tool in furthering enquiries. The dates covered range from 43AD–1937 – that’s almost 2000 years of royal history and genealogical information. As well copious records of various royals and their families and peers, records of Royalist fighters during the English Civil […]

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  • Nick Thorne discovers the highest ranking British officer in online German prisoner of war records Recently I was doing some research on soldiers, sailors and airmen within the newly published World War Two prisoner of war records on TheGenealogist.co.uk and I couldn’t help but notice how so many of the British and Imperial prisoners of war held by the Germans were mostly young men at the time of their captivity. Also quite evident was the fact that the majority of the officers held were not of a high rank. Not a surprise, I thought, as the generals were probably […] 0

    The Fortunes of war

    Nick Thorne discovers the highest ranking British officer in online German prisoner of war records Recently I was doing some research on soldiers, sailors and airmen within the newly published World War Two prisoner of war records on TheGenealogist.co.uk and I couldn’t help but notice how so many of the British and Imperial prisoners of war held by the Germans were mostly young men at the time of their captivity. Also quite evident was the fact that the majority of the officers held were not of a high rank. Not a surprise, I thought, as the generals were probably […]

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  • The latest version of TreeView now allows you to work from the convenience of your home computer, as  Chris Paton explains (Taken from our latest print edition Discover Your Ancestors 5) One of the most important decisions that we need to make when carrying out our family history research  is the means by which we collate the information that we discover. There are many software programs that can help us to do this, but very few constitute the holy grail of the genealogy world – a program that not only does the job, and does it well, but one […] 0

    The new TreeView

    The latest version of TreeView now allows you to work from the convenience of your home computer, as  Chris Paton explains (Taken from our latest print edition Discover Your Ancestors 5) One of the most important decisions that we need to make when carrying out our family history research  is the means by which we collate the information that we discover. There are many software programs that can help us to do this, but very few constitute the holy grail of the genealogy world – a program that not only does the job, and does it well, but one […]

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  • Nick Thorne researches a 19th century cause célèbre with the help of TheGenealogist’s record collections The Illustrated London News for 30 January 1864 indignantly refers to “The Great Scandal Case” of  George Victor Townley, convicted of the cold blooded murder of Miss Elizabeth Caroline Goodwin. I immediately wondered what the circumstances were that had so affronted the gentlemen of the press? We are used to the fourth estate today taking a stance over a matter of justice – especially when they believe it will be popular with their readers and it seems it was just the same in the […] 0

    Criminally insane or cold-blooded murderer?

    Nick Thorne researches a 19th century cause célèbre with the help of TheGenealogist’s record collections The Illustrated London News for 30 January 1864 indignantly refers to “The Great Scandal Case” of  George Victor Townley, convicted of the cold blooded murder of Miss Elizabeth Caroline Goodwin. I immediately wondered what the circumstances were that had so affronted the gentlemen of the press? We are used to the fourth estate today taking a stance over a matter of justice – especially when they believe it will be popular with their readers and it seems it was just the same in the […]

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  • From our December 2015 issue… (Full contents here) Ruth A Symes explores how our ancestors decorated for Christmas, from mistletoe to paper chains Greenery and fruit, sparkle and snow, colourfully dressed tables and walls inscribed with Yuletide mottos – Christmases past were decorated using much the same general combination of ideas as Christmases today. But the specifics of the way our ancestors decorated their homes at any given time in the past depended not only on tradition, but also on what was currently most novel and up-to-date. In the 18th and early 19th centuries, domestic and church decorations at […] 0

    Decking the halls

    From our December 2015 issue… (Full contents here) Ruth A Symes explores how our ancestors decorated for Christmas, from mistletoe to paper chains Greenery and fruit, sparkle and snow, colourfully dressed tables and walls inscribed with Yuletide mottos – Christmases past were decorated using much the same general combination of ideas as Christmases today. But the specifics of the way our ancestors decorated their homes at any given time in the past depended not only on tradition, but also on what was currently most novel and up-to-date. In the 18th and early 19th centuries, domestic and church decorations at […]

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  • From our November 2015 issue… (Full contents here) Anthony Boulton presents a unique and fascinating memoir of his grandfather’s experiences before, during and after World War One The Great War cast its shadow over my grandfather’s life even before it began, because in August 1914 he went on a cook’s tour of the Rhineland. It might be thought that this was not the best time to visit Germany, but the holiday had been booked months beforehand when the European situation had appeared quite stable. Everywhere the British party travelled they became increasingly alarmed at the sight of large-scale movements […] 0

    The Quartermaster’s tale

    From our November 2015 issue… (Full contents here) Anthony Boulton presents a unique and fascinating memoir of his grandfather’s experiences before, during and after World War One The Great War cast its shadow over my grandfather’s life even before it began, because in August 1914 he went on a cook’s tour of the Rhineland. It might be thought that this was not the best time to visit Germany, but the holiday had been booked months beforehand when the European situation had appeared quite stable. Everywhere the British party travelled they became increasingly alarmed at the sight of large-scale movements […]

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  • From our October 2015 issue… (Full contents here) On 8 October, a Sunday, the people of Beverley were disturbed by the ominous sound of the town’s common bell.The Pilgrimage of Grace Some will have understood the meaning from previous ringings. Others will have recalled that, a few days earlier, they had seen the beacons fired on the southern horizon in nearby Lincolnshire, and will have connected the dots. Others still will have heard rumours of an uprising around Louth, and that 40,000 men were in arms to defend the churches of Lincolnshire. Bells were a common way of transmitting […] 0

    Rebels with a cause

    From our October 2015 issue… (Full contents here) On 8 October, a Sunday, the people of Beverley were disturbed by the ominous sound of the town’s common bell.The Pilgrimage of Grace Some will have understood the meaning from previous ringings. Others will have recalled that, a few days earlier, they had seen the beacons fired on the southern horizon in nearby Lincolnshire, and will have connected the dots. Others still will have heard rumours of an uprising around Louth, and that 40,000 men were in arms to defend the churches of Lincolnshire. Bells were a common way of transmitting […]

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  • From our September 2015 issue… (Full contents here) For the last 400 years, museums have offered a way for people to experience treasures from across the globe, as Margaret Powling explores The earliest illustration of a natural history ‘cabinet of curiosities’, from 1599 This question is something of a rhetorical one: what do you do when you have bought a 27-ton railway engine? Richard Cuming, a railway enthusiast, purchased such an engine from Falmouth Docks in 1986. As luck would have it, an old cinema in his village came up for sale and so he and his family decided […] 1

    A day at the museum

    From our September 2015 issue… (Full contents here) For the last 400 years, museums have offered a way for people to experience treasures from across the globe, as Margaret Powling explores The earliest illustration of a natural history ‘cabinet of curiosities’, from 1599 This question is something of a rhetorical one: what do you do when you have bought a 27-ton railway engine? Richard Cuming, a railway enthusiast, purchased such an engine from Falmouth Docks in 1986. As luck would have it, an old cinema in his village came up for sale and so he and his family decided […]

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  • From our August 2015 issue… (Full contents here) Ruth A Symes explores the personal touches left behind by our ancestors in the form of graffiti We tend to investigate the lives of our ancestors through conventional written records, both public and private, but further evidence of their existence might sometimes be found etched on to aspects of the natural world (rocks and trees) as well as physical objects such as desks, doorposts, lintels, church pews, beds and windowsills (to name just the most obvious). These very tangible signs of generations gone by can better be analysed with some understanding of their context. Some ancestral graffiti has a long history. The walls of the Beauchamp Tower […] 1

    History woz ’ere

    From our August 2015 issue… (Full contents here) Ruth A Symes explores the personal touches left behind by our ancestors in the form of graffiti We tend to investigate the lives of our ancestors through conventional written records, both public and private, but further evidence of their existence might sometimes be found etched on to aspects of the natural world (rocks and trees) as well as physical objects such as desks, doorposts, lintels, church pews, beds and windowsills (to name just the most obvious). These very tangible signs of generations gone by can better be analysed with some understanding of their context. Some ancestral graffiti has a long history. The walls of the Beauchamp Tower […]

    Continue Reading